The Avett Brothers – Bring Your Love To Me

The Avett Brothers (From left to right) Scott Avett, Joe Kwon, Bob Crawford, Seth Avett

Once again, The Avett Brothers do not fail to impress. The new album, Magpie and the Dandelion, is full of their classic sound, yet new melodies, harmonies, beats and ideas are prevalent throughout.

I’ve especially been enjoying Bring Your Love To Me. Seth Avett’s smooth, yet raw vocals will give you tingles. Especially the falsetto. The first verse was very relevant for me being that I’m a new dad:

Bring your love to me
I will hold it like a newborn child
One of my own blood
And I might just even sing a song
to keep it calm

The simple, yet unique guitar and banjo parts, accented by the piano, bass and cello will stir your heart. The drums entering at the end of the third verse have the same effect along with the rise in Seth’s vocals. Then comes the walk-up in the tag on the end of the chorus, instruments harmonizing with the vocals and one other, falling in unison. Love it.

I think this quote from the band’s website really sums up their style and why they have such a loyal fan base:

“The songs are honest: just chords with real voices singing real melodies. But, the heart and the energy with which they are sung, is really why people are talking, and why so many sing along.”
– See more at: http://www.theavettbrothers.com/band/#sthash.rzPXaUAp.dpuf

Listen to Bring Your Love To Me on Spotify and check out the whole album!

Bring your love to me
I will hold it like a newborn child
One of my own blood
And I might just even sing a song
to keep it calm

If you’re wondering, am I capable
God knows I am
And if it’s meant to be
I will go alone, God knows I can
Just not as well, and besides what kind of fun is there
to be had with no one else?

And I can only stand here still
And I can only hope you will
keep me in focus long enough to tell
I’m trying to help (that’s all)

Bring your love to me
I will hold it like a dandelion
One I want to save, one I want to keep
from the breeze that follows me and no one else

I can only stand here still
And I can only hope you will
keep me in focus long enough to tell
I’m trying to help

Charlie Parr – 1922

Charlie Parr

Hometown: Austin, MN

Charlie Parr is a true folk singer and guitar picker.

This excerpt from the bio on his website describes Charlie really well:

It’s the music of a self-taught guitarist and banjo player who grew up without a TV but with his dad’s recordings of America’s musical founding fathers, including Charley Patton and Lightnin’ Hopkins, Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly. With his long scraggly hair, fathertime beard, thrift-store workingman’s flannel and jeans, and emphatic, throaty voice, Parr looks and sounds like he would have fit right into Harry Smith’s “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

You can read the full bio here.

I found it interesting that, although Charlie’s shows are primarily in Minnesota and the Northern Plains, he’s gained enough of a following in Ireland and Australia to tour there frequently. He will be performing at The Cedar Cultural Center on Friday and Saturday (Feb. 1 and 2) if you’d like to see him live.

This is a video of Charlie performing his song, 1922, at the Eagan Library – right in my neighborhood! This song really exemplifies his raw, old fashioned style and classic “working man” lyrics.

Well I worked all summer couldn’t save a cent
I gave all my money to the government
I don’t know quite how it got spent
but the banks are coming for my deed though
Man at the mill can’t see though
Let me get my feed for free though
Ain’t that the way it is

I cut out down a braver road
I traded my stock for a V84
Danced for town down on the floor boards
And the title owed down to me though
That gasoline ain’t free through
Just guzzling out my knee bone
Ain’t that the way it is

Well I met me a woman down in Saint Paul
With a little money and a little pole
Bloke told me that he’d bust my jaw
I talked to his sister again though
Don’t mean I couldn’t win though
There’s blood running down my chin now
Ain’t that the way it is

Well I slept all night on the bar room floor
And woke up this morning my head was sore
Pockets empty but I want some more
The bar man’s got my car though
Tales worth more by far though
As I leave her down at the bar now
Ain’t that the way it is

Well I hitched me a ride on the way back home
I got me a job on a family farm
Times are hard here but I can’t roll
And I ain’t got nothing more
Oh that company store
Gold’s looking good for sure though
Ain’t that the way it is

Well I worked all summer counldn’t save a cent
I gave all my money to the government
I don’t know quite how it got spent
But the banks are coming for my deed though
Man at the mill can’t see though
Let me get my feed for free though
Ain’t that the way it is

Surround You by Elliot Road

Hometown: Wichita, KS

Elliot Road is comprised of brothers, James and John Beasley. At times they remind me of Trampled by Turtles, not only because of the prominent banjo, mandolin and fiddle parts in their songs, but also because James Beasley’s voice reminds me of Dave Simonett. Simonett seems to venture back into his rock roots at times, and another key difference between these groups is that Trampled by Turtles is known for many songs that have a quick tempo and intense strumming/plucking, whereas Elliot Road seems to stick to the classic folk/country sound.

I’d have to say that my favorite thing about the Beasley brothers is their harmonies. They have sweet, country notes that seem to melt together.